Texting While Driving Accidents

Today, practically every person driving a car owns a cell phone. People use their devices more and more frequently than a decade ago due to tempting apps and hand-held internet access. However, the use of mobile devices while operating a vehicle is extremely unsafe.

Distracted driving caused 3,179 deaths and 431,000 injuries in 2014 according to the Federal Communications Commission. Unfortunately, drivers continue to use their phones in route and the numbers continue to rise. An estimated 666,000 drivers use a cell phone while driving at any given time in America.

Learn more about why texting while driving and distracted driving causes accidents and why you should put the phone away behind the wheel.

Why Distracted Driving Is So Dangerous

70% of smartphone owners have used their phone and 61% of drivers text while driving. For the brief few seconds it takes to compose and send a text, drivers are distracted for a shockingly long distance. In the five seconds it takes to text on a phone, car users traveling 55 miles an hour end up driving the length of an entire football field. No wonder drivers are 23 times more likely to be involved in an accident if they text while operating a vehicle.

Many experienced drivers overestimate their capability to multi-task and drive. Common stereotypes point the finger at younger drivers for their phone habits, but parents and middle-aged drivers are also guilty. In a survey conducted by Texting and Driving Safety, 27% of adults admitted to sending and receiving text messages while driving.

Out of the six million car accidents every year, 28% are caused by distracted drivers on their cell phones. It is amazing that texting and driving is almost as dangerous as driving intoxicated. If people are aware of the consequences and risks involved in distracted driving, how can we fix the problem?

The Solutions

Don’t make excuses for why you need your phone and lead by example. Drivers should leave their phones in their trunk to avoid the temptation of checking email or looking at new messages.

It is important for parents to set a good example for their children. Young drivers may use their parents as an excuse to text and drive. 48% of young divers reported seeing their parent use their cell phone when they were behind the wheel.

Parents can also buy applications and tech to help make sure their kids don’t text and drive. Drive cams monitor your children’s activity. AT&T also offers an anti-texting and driving app for Android.

State laws also help limit texting while driving and distracted drivers. In fact, 39 states prohibit texting and driving.

Contact MK Trial Law for a FREE Personal Injury Consultation

Have you experienced a collision caused by a distracted driver? Contact us today for a free consultation regarding your texting while driving injury case.