Signs and Symptoms of Traumatic Brain Injury

According to the CDC, there were 282,000 hospitalizations related to traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and 56,000 deaths in 2013 alone. This injury is responsible for 30% of all injury deaths. Traumatic brain injuries are caused by a bump or jolt to the head or a head penetration injury.

TBIs can cause extensive injury to the brain, resulting in death or life-altering changes to a person’s body and mind. It can affect their ability to do daily tasks, including walking, talking, bathing, going to the bathroom, eating, and more. It can prevent someone from being able to work or live independently, and may require that they live with extensive care for the rest of their lives. It can affect a person’s memory, senses, and even personality.

Leading Causes of Traumatic Brain Injury

While traumatic brain injuries can happen to anyone with all sorts of accidents, there are several leading causes of TBIs, including:

  • Falls (47% of TBIs)
  • Being struck by or against an object (22% of TBIs)
  • Motor vehicle crashes (19% of TBIs)
  • Intentional self-harm

Children and elderly adults are more likely to experience a traumatic brain injury.

Signs and Symptoms of a Traumatic Brain Injury

There are clear signs and symptoms of a TBI, but early signs are subtle and are important to look for after a head injury to protect from further damage. TBIs often begin as a concussion, but can become a blood clot that can burst or press on the brain, causing damage. Early signs include:

  • Headache
  • Blurry vision
  • Irritability
  • Feeling sleepy, lethargic, or low energy
  • Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Dizziness
  • Trouble falling asleep
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Sensitivity to light or sound
  • Difficulty with balance
  • Difficulty remembering new information or concentrating
  • Anxiety, sadness, or depression

Danger signs that a concussion has worsened into a TBI include:

  • Headache that won’t go away and gets worse
  • Slurred speech
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Weakness or numbness
  • Decreased coordination
  • Extreme drowsiness, can’t wake up
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • Loss of memory, or cannot recognize previously familiar people or things
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Pupils don’t dilate correctly or are different sizes
  • (in children) Inconsolable, or won’t eat

TBIs in Children and Elderly Adults

Children and elderly adults (65+) are more likely to experience traumatic brain injuries than adolescents or adults.

The main cause of TBI-related death in children ages 0-4 is assault. Whether at childcare, school, or at home, infants and toddlers are susceptible to TBIs because they need constant supervision, care, and watchful attention. Children can receive TBIs from injuries at daycare, through another family member or friend, or even at the hand of a parent. If your child or a family member’s child has suffered a TBI under the watch or care of a childcare facility or guardian, it’s important to speak to an injury lawyer today to help seek compensation for you and your child’s losses.

Elderly adults are also more susceptible to TBIs. These can be caused by the negligence of an assisted living facility, a nursing home, or another guardian. Because they are more prone to slips and falls, they need extra care and watchful attention to ensure their safety. If you believe your family member suffered loss due to negligence, contact Moraitakis & Kushel today.

Traumatic Brain Injury Compensation at Moraitakis & Kushel

If you believe that a loved one has suffered a traumatic brain injury due to the negligence or assault of someone else, contact the injury lawyers in Atlanta at Moraitakis & Kushel. Our team has helped hundreds of people receive compensation for their losses. Contact us today at 800-688-2357 for a free consultation.